Copygirl by Anna Mitchael & Michelle Sassa // Cookie Cutter Plot Didn’t Cut it for Me

 

Copygirl is the cookie cutter for a contemporary women’s fiction novel. The main character, Kay, is a girl in her mid twenties is struggling in her advertising career and love life.

Main Character Hates Everyone

Kay is venomous towards almost every single female in the book because they are female. The reader listens to Kay tear apart women based on their choice of clothing or how “leggy” they are standing next to her and her infinite insecurities. The only two women Kay respects at the beginning of the novel is her BFF and a curious old woman she meets in McDonalds.

Don’t worry though, it’s not just women Kay can’t get along with. She also hates her male coworkers she’s barely spoken to, her brothers because they’re more “perfect” than her, and most people she meets for equally frustrating reasons.

Love Life is a Snooze

The resolution for her love life was evident nearly from page one. Yawn. It took some serious suspension of disbelief to follow that Kay still didn’t realize who she was interested in only a handful of pages before they kiss.

In the single biggest hair-pulling-out-moment in all of woman-kind, Kay sabotages her entire career for a boy who couldn’t care less about her and she forgives him anyway.

It also threw me off that there is no reference to time passing aside from a couple evenings mentioned. Then at the end of the book a random sentence throws in that “hey by the way guys it’s spring” which made me feel like a time traveler.

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Editing Mistakes

I was disappointed to find several mishaps with missing punctuation. I don’t mean we had a grammar debate over whether or not a common should be inserted. Twice there was a sentence that switched midway from Kay’s thoughts to her voice out loud, which had closing quotations but no opening quotations.

Finding those details made this book feel very shoddy like not even the editor could be bothered to read it from beginning to end.

The End

The only redemption was the book’s ending when Kay manages to see some of her most obvious flaws and befriends a few ladies and even a man or two around the office. This ending was the only thing propelling me to finish the novel.

Unfortunately, some scenes were never redeemed. I’m not sure the authors realized how ridiculous it was that Kay had to have a physical makeover to be happy in life. At the end of the day, Kay is still a huge pushover when it comes to boys, and I don’t think she learned very much.
I give Copygirl two stars because the novel still managed to keep me turning the page while I waited for the main character to wisen up.

 


Mad Men meets The Devil Wears Prada in this lively debut about a young woman imageworking at the hippest ad agency in New York…

So. You want to work in advertising. The glitz, the glamour, the cocktail-fueled brainstorming sessions and Xbox breaks. Sounds like a dream job, right?

Wrong. The reality can be a nightmare. There are five simple rules for succeeding in the ad world—and I think I’ve already broken every single one…

1) Never let them see you cry. Even if your best friend breaks your heart. And posts it all over social media.

2) Be one of the boys. And, if you were born with the wrong equipment, flaunt what you’ve got to distract them while you get ahead.

3) Come up with the perfect pitch in an instant—or have your resumé ready to go at all times.

4) Trust no one. Seriously. If you don’t watch your back, they’ll steal your ideas, your pride, even your stapler.

5) Most importantly, don’t ever, under any circumstances, be a CopyGirl.

Trust me. I know…


 

What’s the most cliché book you’ve ever read?

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  1. Pingback: To Buy or to Borrow, That is the Question – Hounds and Habits

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